Hiram MCCOYLucretia RICHARDSONJohn Crafton BENNINGTONSarah C BRANDON
William (Bud) MCCOYMary BENNINGTON
Charles MCCOY
°8 May 1876
Unionville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
+5 Feb 1931
Bartholomew County, Indiana

x1 9 Oct 1898 Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Rettie ROBERTSON
Emma L MC COY  Bertle W MCCOY  Elbert Wayne "Mac" MCCOY   Maude Augusta MCCOY  Newton Howard MCCOY  Wesley Lenton MCCOY  

x2 Monroe

x3 5 Aug 1911 Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Nellie HYDE
Fay John "Beanie" HYDE MCCOY  Amanda MCCOY*   Louise MCCOY  Woodrow W. MCCOY 
Sources : S13 S50 S68
Events :

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Pleasant Emanuel ROBERTSONMary MCCOY
David ROBERTSON
John D. ROBERTSON
°
+

x
Bessie ROBERTSON*  Carl Leslie ROBERTSON  Leland ROBERTSON  
Events :

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David ROBERTSON
John D. ROBERTSON
Carl Leslie ROBERTSON
°14 Jul 1910
+8 Nov 1969
Lt. Union Baptist Church- Unionville, , Indiana?

x
Ethel FERGUSON
Sources : S68
Events :

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Mccoy ROBERTSON
°
+

x
? ROBERTSON  ? ROBERTSON   ? ROBERTSON  Odis ROBERTSON 
Events :

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Elizabeth JOHNSON
°
+

x
John MCLARY
Events :

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Mccoy ROBERTSON
? ROBERTSON
°8 Mar 1903
+

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Mccoy ROBERTSON
? ROBERTSON
°14 Nov 1904
+

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Mccoy ROBERTSON
? ROBERTSON
°22 Oct 1906
+

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David Junior YOUNGElizabeth MCCOY
Hiram MCCOYLucretia RICHARDSON
Joel MCCOY
°28 Nov 1854
Unionville, Monroe, Indiana, USA
+30 Nov 1907
Unionville, Monroe, Indiana, USA

x 27 Aug 1874 Monroe, Indiana, USA
Sareptia COX
Frank MCCOY*  Andrew J MCCOY*  George MCCOY  Hiram MCCOY  Jasper MCCOY*  Eliza MCCOY  Lizzie MCCOY  David MCCOY  Minnie MCCOY* 
Notes : Killed by Ed Ford along with his son Frank

Bloomington (IN) Telephone, Dec 3, 1907, p. 4.
JOEL MCCOY DIES THIS MORNING AT 9 O'CLOCK.
EDWARD FORD TELLS STORY IN BLOOMINGTON JAIL

From Saturday's Daily--Joel McCoy, the second victim of the "wood chopping" tragedy at Widow Hawley's on Brummett's Creek, died this morning at 9 o’clock, death resulting from traumatic pneumonia. The father and son lie dead in the McCoy home awaiting the funeral, which is tomorrow at 1:30 from the church at Unionville.

Ed Ford, the murderer, is in the Bloomington jail. His two sons, who saw the tragedy, are at the home on Brummett's Creek, nearly within hailing distance of the McCoy place. The entire countryside is engrossed in the tragedy, work has been practically suspended, and nothing is talked but the fatal clash of the McCoy’s and Ford.

Many of the neighbors refer to Ford as the "bad man from Jackson Creek" and other speak of him as "Bob Ford's cousin," the latter name being given because it is said that many times Ford, the slayer of the McCoy’s, has claimed kin with Bob Ford, the bandit who turned traitor and brought the sensational career of the notorious Jesse James to an end by shooting him from behind.

That personal feeling, amounting almost to a feud, caused the tragedy, as admitted by all. It started months ago over the shooting of a dog, then two horses belonging to Ford died unexpectedly and insinuations followed. When the two factions met on the hillside, 200 yards from Widow Hawley's, trouble was not far from the mind of any of them. Ford, in his inside coat pocket, carried a 38 caliber Iver Johnson revolver and Frank McCoy's "wampus" vest hid a rusted 38 "bull dog" gun, four of its chambers loaded. Frank McCoy never used that gun, he passed into eternity with it reposing in his pocket, and no one knew it was there until the coroner at 5 o'clock searched the clothes of the dead man.

As to who started the fight on the hill, there are two stories. Joel McCoy, before dying, made a statement accusing Ford of starting the fight. However, the elder McCoy did admit when he was shot he had an ax and was advancing on Ford. "Because," he gasped as he told the story to a Daily reporter, "he was pulling his gun and I had to do something.” Ford's story, given in detail in another place, lays the blame of the fight on the McCoy’s.

With Frank McCoy lying motionless in death and the old man, writhing in a pool of his own blood, Ford and his two sons went on with their wood chopping. The boys felled a tree and the "bad man from Jackson Creek" went about splitting it. Jodie Richardson, attracted by the shots, came to the scene. Richardson thought it might be advisable to go for a doctor and Ford agreed with him.

Then the women folks came on the scene. They had gathered at the widow's home for the festivities of the "wood chopping" and the wife of Joel McCoy was among them. The Fords paid little attention to them, to their cries of anguish and torrents of tears, but steadily they chopped wood until one of the boys grabbing his father's arm cried, "Let's get out of here. There comes Dave McCoy with a gun," and pointed across the little valley towards the Hawley home.

As the brother of the dead and dying came towards the scene, the Fords threw down their implements and silently passed up over the hill, an immense hill that lies at the boundary of Brown and Monroe counties. Ford went to Needmore, Brown County. Later he started to Nashville but changed his mind and returned to Needmore where he was taken into custody by Dr. Prather, the coroner of Brown County, who had been "phoned" by Sheriff Ratliff. Ford's explanation of this is that he wanted to go to Bloomington as he thought the ...to take him from the officers. Coroner Prather told him he would be protected and at 2 o’clock, he was taken in charge by Sheriff Ratliff and brought to this city.

At the Widow Hawley's everything was in confusion. The day of festivity had been changed into a day of sorrow.

The neighbors gathered at the place, many of them dropping in for the wood chopping, and not hearing of the tragedy until they arrived. Dr. Fritch of Unionville was sent for and the officers notified. The wounded man was removed to the Hawley home and his wound dressed. The body of the dead man, however, was not touched until Coroner Harris, of Ellettsville, arrived at 4:30 in the afternoon. All throughout the day, surrounded by the neighborhood men, it lay on the hillside, face downward in the position it slipped to ground after the last bullet was fired from Ford's revolver.

It was not known that the dead man had a revolver until the Coroner searched the body. The feeling of the neighborhood was plainly with the McCoy’s, the bullet hole in the back of the dead man's neck and his powder burned coat caused many expressions of hard feeling from those at the scene.

The women of the neighborhood gathered at the house and at 12:30, the officers and reporters from Bloomington arrived. For the "wood chopping" festivities, a huge dinner had been prepared of all the good things country dinners are composed of--chicken, dumplings, pork and all kinds of vegetables, pie and cakes which had been prepared the day before. At the noon hour the dinner was served, but under pathetically different circumstances from which it was intended. Silently, the men gathered around the table and partook of the good fowl, their minds upon the dead man on the hillside and the dying man in the front room.

If one thing could have been more pathetic than another, it was the grief of the members of the McCoy family. One daughter, a pretty girl of (illegible) had been living at the home of Thomas Baugh, North College Avenue, the city, but she was at home to spend Thanksgiving when the tragedy occurred.

An examination of Frank McCoy by the Coroner revealed that he had been shot three times. The first shot struck his breast and ranged downward making an instantly fatal wound. The other two shots were in the back, one almost directly in the center of the back of the neck. His neck was badly powder burnt and his coat was burnt from the close proximity of the revolver when these two shots were fired.

The bullet, which proved fatal to Joel McCoy, entered at the front just below the neck and ranged downward into the lung. Traumatic pneumonia, caught from the wound, brought the quick death.

Edward Ford, in one of the front rooms of the jail this morning, told his story to Coroner Harris, Sheriff Ratliff, Deputy Route and a Daily reporter.

“I got an invitation to the Hawley wood chopping through the children.” The Hawley children told my children to ask me. We, my two sons, Donald and Arnold, were the first ones there. Donald is between 16 and 17 and Arnold is 15. We warmed a while and then went to the woods, about 200 yards from the house. We had cut two small trees and were working on a third when the McCoy’s came up.

"I bid them the time of day. Frank did not answer but the old man did. Frank, I says 'I haven't seen you for a good while, where have you been keeping yourself?’ He said that there was some difference between us and he did not care to see me."

Then the following conversation took place according to Ford:

Frank McCoy--"I understand you accuse me of killing your horses."

Ed Ford--"Frank, I have never mentioned no name who I thought done it."

Frank McCoy--"If you think I done it, just say so."

Ed Ford--"No, I won't, that's just what you want; maybe I lack a little of proving it, and you would have a damage suit against me."

Frank McCoy--"I didn't do it."...cause I think where a man loses something is a good place to find it."

Just here the real trouble started. According to Ford, the elder McCoy began to curse with the phrase "You're another.” Ford says the two McCoy’s tried to get on different sides of him but he prevented this by stepping back and that Joel McCoy, raising his ax to strike, yelled, "I don't allow no damn rascal to slander me or steal my home," and started for him.

Ford says Joel McCoy struck at him, that he warded off the blow, and that the ax glanced off his head and clipped a small piece of his chin.

Then Ford says, "I fired and Joel went down. Frank came within reach. I stepped back and he followed me. He started to strike and I jumped under the blow close up against his body and shot twice. He clung to me his shoulders against my breast. I put my gun to his back and pulled it twice and he sank to the ground. The powder had set his coat afire at the back and I reached down and put it out with my fingers.

“My boys had taken no part. I do not believe they moved during the fight. I told the boys to go on splitting until somebody came. I picked up the first ax I came to and went ahead splitting. Jodie Richards (? Richardson) was the first to come. Jodie bid me the time of day. Joel McCoy was carrying on at a terrible rate with misery and Jodie said he was going for a doctor but Joel begged him not to leave him. Then the women folks came up. Joel's wife among them, but I paid no attention to them. One of my boys grabbed my arm and said, "Let's get out of this, here comes Dave McCoy with a gun.

“We went up over the hill and I sent my boys home and told them to tell their Ma not to worry that I had gone to Indianapolis to give myself up. I was going to Indianapolis instead of Bloomington because Sheriff Ratliff was kin to the McCoy’s. I told Henry Poling at Needmore about it and asked him to go to Indianapolis with me but he could not. After about an hour, Dr. Prather, the coroner of Brown County, arrested me and in a little while the sheriff brought me here."

During the telling of the horrible story, the murderer showed absolutely no emotion except when he spoke of his boy warning him that Dave McCoy was coming across the little valley with a gun. Then suddenly, he broke into tears and sobbed violently. After the story was finished, the coroner was reading over the evidence to Ford when the phone bell range. Sheriff Ratliff answered it and then turned around and told the news that old man McCoy had just died. The murderer made no comment and was led back to his cell.

On Ford's chin, there is a slight cut. It may or may not have been made with an ax. Sheriff Ratliff is no kin to either of the dead men but is slightly related to Dave McCoy's wife.
Sources : S68
Events :

Back
Hiram MCCOYLucretia RICHARDSON
Joel MCCOYSareptia COX
Frank MCCOY
°7 Jul 1876
+29 Nov 1907

x
? MCCOY   Glen MCCOY  
Notes : Killed by Ed Ford along with his father Joel McCoy

Bloomington (IN) Telephone, Dec 3, 1907, p. 4.
JOEL MCCOY DIES THIS MORNING AT 9 O'CLOCK.
EDWARD FORD TELLS STORY IN BLOOMINGTON JAIL

From Saturday's Daily--Joel McCoy, the second victim of the "wood chopping" tragedy at Widow Hawley's on Brummett's Creek, died this morning at 9 o’clock, death resulting from traumatic pneumonia. The father and son lie dead in the McCoy home awaiting the funeral, which is tomorrow at 1:30 from the church at Unionville.

Ed Ford, the murderer, is in the Bloomington jail. His two sons, who saw the tragedy, are at the home on Brummett's Creek, nearly within hailing distance of the McCoy place. The entire countryside is engrossed in the tragedy, work has been practically suspended, and nothing is talked but the fatal clash of the McCoy’s and Ford.

Many of the neighbors refer to Ford as the "bad man from Jackson Creek" and other speak of him as "Bob Ford's cousin," the latter name being given because it is said that many times Ford, the slayer of the McCoy’s, has claimed kin with Bob Ford, the bandit who turned traitor and brought the sensational career of the notorious Jesse James to an end by shooting him from behind.

That personal feeling, amounting almost to a feud, caused the tragedy, as admitted by all. It started months ago over the shooting of a dog, then two horses belonging to Ford died unexpectedly and insinuations followed. When the two factions met on the hillside, 200 yards from Widow Hawley's, trouble was not far from the mind of any of them. Ford, in his inside coat pocket, carried a 38 caliber Iver Johnson revolver and Frank McCoy's "wampus" vest hid a rusted 38 "bull dog" gun, four of its chambers loaded. Frank McCoy never used that gun, he passed into eternity with it reposing in his pocket, and no one knew it was there until the coroner at 5 o'clock searched the clothes of the dead man.

As to who started the fight on the hill, there are two stories. Joel McCoy, before dying, made a statement accusing Ford of starting the fight. However, the elder McCoy did admit when he was shot he had an ax and was advancing on Ford. "Because," he gasped as he told the story to a Daily reporter, "he was pulling his gun and I had to do something.” Ford's story, given in detail in another place, lays the blame of the fight on the McCoy’s.

With Frank McCoy lying motionless in death and the old man, writhing in a pool of his own blood, Ford and his two sons went on with their wood chopping. The boys felled a tree and the "bad man from Jackson Creek" went about splitting it. Jodie Richardson, attracted by the shots, came to the scene. Richardson thought it might be advisable to go for a doctor and Ford agreed with him.

Then the women folks came on the scene. They had gathered at the widow's home for the festivities of the "wood chopping" and the wife of Joel McCoy was among them. The Fords paid little attention to them, to their cries of anguish and torrents of tears, but steadily they chopped wood until one of the boys grabbing his father's arm cried, "Let's get out of here. There comes Dave McCoy with a gun," and pointed across the little valley towards the Hawley home.

As the brother of the dead and dying came towards the scene, the Fords threw down their implements and silently passed up over the hill, an immense hill that lies at the boundary of Brown and Monroe counties. Ford went to Needmore, Brown County. Later he started to Nashville but changed his mind and returned to Needmore where he was taken into custody by Dr. Prather, the coroner of Brown County, who had been "phoned" by Sheriff Ratliff. Ford's explanation of this is that he wanted to go to Bloomington as he thought the ...to take him from the officers. Coroner Prather told him he would be protected and at 2 o’clock, he was taken in charge by Sheriff Ratliff and brought to this city.

At the Widow Hawley's everything was in confusion. The day of festivity had been changed into a day of sorrow.

The neighbors gathered at the place, many of them dropping in for the wood chopping, and not hearing of the tragedy until they arrived. Dr. Fritch of Unionville was sent for and the officers notified. The wounded man was removed to the Hawley home and his wound dressed. The body of the dead man, however, was not touched until Coroner Harris, of Ellettsville, arrived at 4:30 in the afternoon. All throughout the day, surrounded by the neighborhood men, it lay on the hillside, face downward in the position it slipped to ground after the last bullet was fired from Ford's revolver.

It was not known that the dead man had a revolver until the Coroner searched the body. The feeling of the neighborhood was plainly with the McCoy’s, the bullet hole in the back of the dead man's neck and his powder burned coat caused many expressions of hard feeling from those at the scene.

The women of the neighborhood gathered at the house and at 12:30, the officers and reporters from Bloomington arrived. For the "wood chopping" festivities, a huge dinner had been prepared of all the good things country dinners are composed of--chicken, dumplings, pork and all kinds of vegetables, pie and cakes which had been prepared the day before. At the noon hour the dinner was served, but under pathetically different circumstances from which it was intended. Silently, the men gathered around the table and partook of the good fowl, their minds upon the dead man on the hillside and the dying man in the front room.

If one thing could have been more pathetic than another, it was the grief of the members of the McCoy family. One daughter, a pretty girl of (illegible) had been living at the home of Thomas Baugh, North College Avenue, the city, but she was at home to spend Thanksgiving when the tragedy occurred.

An examination of Frank McCoy by the Coroner revealed that he had been shot three times. The first shot struck his breast and ranged downward making an instantly fatal wound. The other two shots were in the back, one almost directly in the center of the back of the neck. His neck was badly powder burnt and his coat was burnt from the close proximity of the revolver when these two shots were fired.

The bullet, which proved fatal to Joel McCoy, entered at the front just below the neck and ranged downward into the lung. Traumatic pneumonia, caught from the wound, brought the quick death.

Edward Ford, in one of the front rooms of the jail this morning, told his story to Coroner Harris, Sheriff Ratliff, Deputy Route and a Daily reporter.

“I got an invitation to the Hawley wood chopping through the children.” The Hawley children told my children to ask me. We, my two sons, Donald and Arnold, were the first ones there. Donald is between 16 and 17 and Arnold is 15. We warmed a while and then went to the woods, about 200 yards from the house. We had cut two small trees and were working on a third when the McCoy’s came up.

"I bid them the time of day. Frank did not answer but the old man did. Frank, I says 'I haven't seen you for a good while, where have you been keeping yourself?’ He said that there was some difference between us and he did not care to see me."

Then the following conversation took place according to Ford:

Frank McCoy--"I understand you accuse me of killing your horses."

Ed Ford--"Frank, I have never mentioned no name who I thought done it."

Frank McCoy--"If you think I done it, just say so."

Ed Ford--"No, I won't, that's just what you want; maybe I lack a little of proving it, and you would have a damage suit against me."

Frank McCoy--"I didn't do it."...cause I think where a man loses something is a good place to find it."

Just here the real trouble started. According to Ford, the elder McCoy began to curse with the phrase "You're another.” Ford says the two McCoy’s tried to get on different sides of him but he prevented this by stepping back and that Joel McCoy, raising his ax to strike, yelled, "I don't allow no damn rascal to slander me or steal my home," and started for him.

Ford says Joel McCoy struck at him, that he warded off the blow, and that the ax glanced off his head and clipped a small piece of his chin.

Then Ford says, "I fired and Joel went down. Frank came within reach. I stepped back and he followed me. He started to strike and I jumped under the blow close up against his body and shot twice. He clung to me his shoulders against my breast. I put my gun to his back and pulled it twice and he sank to the ground. The powder had set his coat afire at the back and I reached down and put it out with my fingers.

“My boys had taken no part. I do not believe they moved during the fight. I told the boys to go on splitting until somebody came. I picked up the first ax I came to and went ahead splitting. Jodie Richards (? Richardson) was the first to come. Jodie bid me the time of day. Joel McCoy was carrying on at a terrible rate with misery and Jodie said he was going for a doctor but Joel begged him not to leave him. Then the women folks came up. Joel's wife among them, but I paid no attention to them. One of my boys grabbed my arm and said, "Let's get out of this, here comes Dave McCoy with a gun.

“We went up over the hill and I sent my boys home and told them to tell their Ma not to worry that I had gone to Indianapolis to give myself up. I was going to Indianapolis instead of Bloomington because Sheriff Ratliff was kin to the McCoy’s. I told Henry Poling at Needmore about it and asked him to go to Indianapolis with me but he could not. After about an hour, Dr. Prather, the coroner of Brown County, arrested me and in a little while the sheriff brought me here."

During the telling of the horrible story, the murderer showed absolutely no emotion except when he spoke of his boy warning him that Dave McCoy was coming across the little valley with a gun. Then suddenly, he broke into tears and sobbed violently. After the story was finished, the coroner was reading over the evidence to Ford when the phone bell range. Sheriff Ratliff answered it and then turned around and told the news that old man McCoy had just died. The murderer made no comment and was led back to his cell.

On Ford's chin, there is a slight cut. It may or may not have been made with an ax. Sheriff Ratliff is no kin to either of the dead men but is slightly related to Dave McCoy's wife.

Events :

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Joel MCCOYSareptia COX
Frank MCCOY
? MCCOY
°25 Mar 1903
+

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Joel MCCOYSareptia COX
Frank MCCOY
Glen MCCOY
°15 Jun 1904
+
Events :

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Lucretia RICHARDSON
°22 Sep 1829
Tennessee
+15 Feb 1908

x 25 Apr 1847 Monroe, Indiana, United States
Hiram MCCOY
William (Bud) MCCOY*  Martha Jane MCCOY  John M. MCCOY  Joel MCCOY*  Andrew Jackson MCCOY  David MCCOY*  Amanda MCCOY*  Ellen MCCOY*  Lucretia MCCOY 
Sources : S68
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